Renewed Heart Ministries does not charge a fee for our seminars. We exist solely on the support of our monthly donors. All we have ever asked is that our travel expenses for seminars simply be reimbursed, which are also kept at a minimum. If you would like to request one of our free educational seminars, below you will find a list of our most popular ones. We can also custom design a seminar for your unique event.

Weekend Seminars 10 Day Seminars
On Earth as it is in Heaven

The Jesus of the gospels was an itinerant, Jewish teacher, traveling throughout Galilee gathering those who would join him in a radical new social-order that he subversively called “the empire of God.” This “empire” was very unlike the exploitative systems of his day. It was not referring to a place some go to when they die, but an entirely different social order, here and now. This new social order was centered in the mutual-aid of people taking care of people.

This series is an exploration of what Jesus envisioned when he prayed, “Your Kingdom come, your will be done, on earth, as it is done in heaven . . . “



The Awakening

Jesus’ sayings are rooted in love. And only by love can love be awakened. It cannot be done by threat, violence, or force. The exercise of force is contrary to the sayings of Jesus. Love cannot be commanded. It cannot be won by show of authority. Only by a show of love can love awaken in the heart of another.

This is the secret to understanding the nonviolent liberating and healing work of the Jesus of the gospels.  Jesus embraced the marginalized and outcast even at personal cost.  Jesus modeled for us what a world centered in love looks like. He was on the side of the oppressed, offering a way to awaken their oppressors to the injustice they were participating in.  This love is rooted in justice for all, not a retributive justice, but restorative and transformative justice which includes redemptive and transformative mercy, even for one’s enemies.  This goal of this awakening is to ultimately impact the way we relate to each other making our world a safer, more just, and more compassionate home for us all.

 



And Forgive Us Our Trespasses . . .

Some of the most significant, relationally inhibiting misconceptions in our modern culture are the misunderstandings that surround the subject of Forgiveness.  Does the forgiveness Jesus taught us to embrace depend on apologies is made first? Or does this forgiveness passively mean we simply “let others off the hook?”  Is the type of forgiveness Jesus teaches us to exercise permissive or transformative? Is it passively enabling? Or is it awakening, liberating, and restorative? Is it simply relinquishing the right of retribution, or is it a powerful tool for the transformation of both oppressor and the oppressed? Whether someone has wrestled with either forgiving others or being forgiven, when we place the transparency of the sayings of Jesus over these questions, a new dimension to our understanding of Jesus’ idea of forgiveness begins to emerge.



Why God, Why

If the chief attribute of the Divine is Love, then why do people suffer so much? Liberation from human suffering is the primary theme of the Jesus stories in the gospels. This series dialogues with the emotionally charged questions that many throughout history have wrestled with regarding the problem of suffering, the problem of evil, unanswered prayer, and more. The struggle to make sense of human suffering has motivated much of Herb’s life-long searching, and it is in this series that he shares with us what he feels are the questions the Jesus story is teaching us to ask, as well as the work of engaging human suffering that the sayings of Jesus are calling us to take up.



Jesus and the Bible

This series addresses the challenge that many find in the differences between Jesus of Nazareth and some other sections of the Bible. What makes this things more challenging is that a significant portion of the Bible was the sacred text of the people that Jesus emerged out of. Many today find the God of Bible to be a nationalistic, violent, racist who is genocidal, misogynistic, homophobic, in favor of slavery, and more. Yet when we look at Jesus we get an entirely, radically, different picture. The early followers of Jesus were just that, that were Jesus-followers. If you have ever wrestled with questions concerning the contrast between the “God” of certain Bible passages and the liberating, healing work of of the Jesus found in the gospels, then this series is for you.



The Sayings of Jesus (Weekend Edition)

The Sayings of Jesus (Weekend Edition) is a weekend seminar that takes a look at the sayings of Jesus through what most scholars refer to as Sayings Gospel Q.  The Q source material (also called the Sayings Gospel Q) is believed to have belonged to the Jewish Jesus community and included sayings of Jesus that they cherished. These are the Sayings that, each time they are discovered, have historically inspired significant positive world change. From Francis of Assisi and the sixteenth-century Anabaptists to more contemporary examples such as Gandhi, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and others, whenever those who desire to follow Jesus’ teachings have sought to rediscover and practice what those teachings actually were, the result has been positive change in our world.



The Way

The early, first-century, Jewish Jesus did not travel the countryside showing the way to heaven, but rather the way to heal our world.  It was a completely counterintuitive way of doing life that Jesus subversively referred to as “the empire of God.” In short, this was a world rooted principles of mutual aid, a preferential option for the poor, of nonviolence, and enemy transforming love.  This was a world where people cease creating ways to more efficiently dominate and subjugate one another, and begin taking care of each other.  This is a world where people take care of people.

 



A Shared Table

Jesus modeled for us a way of practicing community in the shape of a shared table.  It is a signifcant rearrangement of our life which abandons the way of pyramids of oppression, privileging some while subordinating others. It breaks down circles of exclusivity, which marginalizes those who are different as “other,” replacing those forms with a table around which there is no hierarchy, rich diversity, and genuine inclusion.  It is a world where every voice matters, and each person’s story and experience is valued.  It is rooted in a posture of listening, out of which our values become informed, as we, integrate the many diverse experiences of life into a meaningful and coherent whole.  The result, we believe, is a world that becomes a safer, more just, more compassionate home for us all.



The Sayings of Jesus

This series takes a look at the sayings of Jesus through what most scholars refer to as Sayings Gospel Q.  The Q source material (also called the Sayings Gospel Q) is believed to have belonged to the Jewish Jesus community and included sayings of Jesus that they cherished. These are the Sayings that, each time they are discovered, have historically inspired significant positive world change. From Francis of Assisi and the sixteenth-century Anabaptists to more contemporary examples such as Gandhi, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and others, whenever those who desire to follow Jesus’ teachings have sought to rediscover and practice what those teachings actually were, the result has been positive change in our world.

This series is an intellectually-honest look at the ethical teachings of an itinerant Jewish teacher referred to, by his early followers, as Jesus of Nazareth. This is not another apologetic defense of the world religion labelled “Christianity.”  On the contrary, it is an effort to grasp more clearly what the historical Jesus did and taught, and pondering whether those teachings and actions hold any relevance for us in our world today.  These sayings pointed the “way” toward making our world a safer, more just, more compassionate home for us all.



Follow the Lamb

A new approach to the book of Revelation through the lens of Jesus’ teachings on nonviolence.

Out of all the major documents we possess today from the early Jesus community, JOHN’S REVELATION has received the least attention from scholars. The picture we get from the early Jesus story of the first century is that of a traveling teacher, traversing Galilee gathering those who would join him in what he subversively called “the empire of God.” (Which at it’s core was a new world vision where people simply began to mutually take care of people.)

Take away the lens of alarmist prediction, and use instead the lens of the ethical teachings of Jesus and Revelation becomes a whole new book! It ceases to be so much about predicting the future and becomes A MESSAGE OF HOPE, coming down to us in the present from a not too distant possible future. It promises NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR TOMORROW if we will but listen today. When understood on it own cultural backdrop, Revelation surprisingly becomes a treatise on nonviolent world transformation within the early Jesus community.

Jesus gave us a way to HEAL OUR WORLD. The question we must ask is whether or not the sayings of Jesus remain relevant to us in the 21st century.