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Womanism

"We say no to big banks. We say no to corporate executives making millions of dollars a year. We say no to student debt, we say no to evictions. We say no to global capitalism. We say no to the prison industrial complex. We say no to racism, we say no to class exploitation, we say no to homophobia, we say no to transphobia, we say no to ableism. We say no to military occupation. We say no to war."    - Angela Davis ; Occupy Wall Street


"I had crossed de line of which I had so long been dreaming. I was free; but dere was no one to welcome me to de land of freedom, I was a stranger in a strange land, and my home after all was down in de old cabin quarter, wid de ole folks, and my brudders and sisters. But to dis solemn resolution I came; I was free, and dey should be free also; I would make a home for dem in de North, and de Lord helping me, I would bring dem all dere. Oh, how I prayed den, lying all alone on de cold, damp ground; 'Oh, dear Lord,' I said, 'I haint got no friend but you. Come to my help, Lord, for I'm in trouble!'"    - Harriet Tubman ; Harriet, The Moses of Her People (1886)


“The master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house.”    - Audre Lord ; This Bridge Called My Back by Cherríe Moraga and Gloria E. Anzaldúa


"Antoinette Wire (2005) believes that women may have carried primary responsibility for stewarding oral Jesus traditions and that the writer of Mark could well have been female. I delight in that possibility."    - Ched Myers ; Binding the Strong Man


So the womanist theologian uses the sociopolitical thought and action of the African-American woman's world to show black women their salvation does not depend upon any form of surrogacy made sacred by traditional and orthodox understandings of Jesus’ life and death. Rather their salvation is assured by Jesus’ life of resistance and by the survival strategies he used to help people survive the death of identity caused by their exchange of inherited cultural meanings for a new identity shaped by the gospel ethics and world view.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


This spiritual-political connection in black Christian women's experience has continued beyond Tubman's death in the life and work of such women as Ida Wells, Rosa Parks, Fannie Lou Hamer and others.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


In the biblical account in Genesis Hagar's experiences in the wilderness are constituted by political and spiritual interconnections.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


Second, the Hagar (and child) content of the wilderness symbolism brings together the spiritual and the political.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


Liberation in the Hagar stories is not given by God; it finds its source in human initiative.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


Hagar becomes the first female in the Bible to liberate herself from oppressive power structures.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


They expressed their belief that God was involved in their history, that God helped them make a way out of no way.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


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