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Redemptive-Suffering

". . . to give his people the knowledge of salvation through the forgiveness of their sins because of the tender mercy of our God, by which the rising sun will come to us from heaven . . ."    - Luke ; Luke 1.77-78


"Women are acculturated to accept abuse. We come to believe that it is our place to suffer. Breaking silence about the victimization of women and the ways in which we have become anesthetized to our violation is a central theme in women's literature, theology, art, social action, and politics. With every new revelation we confront again the deep and painful secret that sustains us in oppression: We have been convinced that our suffering is justified."
   - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"There has been a tendency to isolate the cross from the historical course that led Jesus to it by virtue of his conflicts with those who held political religious power. In this way the cross has been turned into nothing more than a paradigm of the suffering to which all human beings are subject insofar as they are limited beings. This has given rise to a mys- tique of suffering rather than to a mystique of following Jesus, whose historical career led to the historical cross."    - Jon Sobrino ; Christology at the Crossroads


"We would not reject the image of God as a Suffering God and would welcome the demise of that distant, impassive patriarch in the clouds who is beyond being affected by the turmoil below. The advent of the Suffering God changes the entire face of theology, but it does not necessarily offer liberation for those who suffer."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"The only legitimate reason for women to remain in the church will be if the church were to condemn as anathema the glorification of suffering. If the church is the place where cycles of abuse are named, condemned, and broken can it be a haven of blessing and a place of peace for women. That the church is such a place is not clearly evident. Whether Christianity in essence frees or imprisons is the issue that must be considered."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"Many women, however, even when conscious of the church's contribution to our suffering, do not leave. We stay in the institution. Feminist theologians who attempt to rework the tradition by finding feminist undercurrents and countercultures, doing new quests for the historical feminist Jesus, and writing women back unto the Bible and the tradition (the Inclusive Language Lectionary is a good example) are trying valiantly to 'fix' the institution so that they can remain in it. They enter the ordained ministry in order to 'redeem' the church, but they pay so high a personal, emotional, and psychological price that they begin to resemble the very people they want to redeem. All the while, they call to their crucified lord to understand their suffering and support them in their times of trial and martyrdom."
   - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"The qualities that Christianity idealizes, especially for women, are also those of a victim: sacrificial love, passive acceptance of suffering, humility, meekness, etc. Since these are the qualities idealized in Jesus 'who died for our sins,' his functioning as a model reinforces the scapegoat syndrome for women"
   - Mary Daly ; Beyond God the Father


"Christianity has been a primary—in many women's lives the primary—force in shaping our acceptance of abuse. The central image of Christ on the cross as the savior of the world communicates the message that suffering is redemptive. If the best person who ever lived gave his life for others, then, to be of value we should likewise sacrifice ourselves. Any sense that we have a right to care for our own needs is in conflict with being a faithful follower of Jesus. Our suffering for others will save the world."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


She [Delores S. Williams] contends that theologians need to think seriously about the real-life consequences of redemptive suffering, God-talk that equates the acceptance of pain, misery, and abuse as the way for true believers to live as authentic Christian disciples. Those who spew such false teaching and warped preaching must cease and desist.    - Katie G. Cannon ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


She [Williams] contends that theologians need to think seriously about the real-life consequences of redemptive suffering, God-talk that equates the acceptance of pain, misery, and abuse as the way for true believers to live as authentic Christian disciples. Those who spew such false teaching and warped preaching must cease and desist.    - Delores S. Williams ; Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk


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