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Feminist-Theology

"Women are acculturated to accept abuse. We come to believe that it is our place to suffer. Breaking silence about the victimization of women and the ways in which we have become anesthetized to our violation is a central theme in women's literature, theology, art, social action, and politics. With every new revelation we confront again the deep and painful secret that sustains us in oppression: We have been convinced that our suffering is justified."
   - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"Violence can beget fear, stalemate, annihilation, dominance, or more violence, but it cannot beget love, justice, abundant life, community, or peace."    - Rita Nakashima Brock & Rev. Dr. Rebecca Parker ; Saving Paradise


"The women’s movement displays its real strength when it presents a vision of life that differs from the prevailing one. Women will become strong when they stop worshiping the golden calves that men worship: unlimited economic growth, national security, the balance of terror . . . We shall become free only when we beat our swords into plowshares, as Isaiah says, and when we learn to operate irrigation systems, not tanks. We shall be free and we shall be women only when we join forces with life against production for death and the ongoing preparation for murder. We shall not become free by retiring into the private sphere and saying, ‘Count me out,’ nor shall we become free by conforming to a society that holds its generals and millionaires in particularly high regard. We shall become free when we learn to work for peace actively, deliberately, and militantly."
   - Dorothee Sölle ; Of War and Love


"Raped, despised, and rejected by a man, Tamar is a woman of sorrows rows and acquainted with grief. She is cut off from the land of the living, stricken for the sins of her brother; yet she herself has done no violence and there is no deceit in her mouth."
   - Phyllis Trible ; Texts of Terror


"Or suppose a woman has ten silver coins and loses one. Doesn’t she light a lamp, sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it?"

   - Jesus ; Luke 15.8


"Liberation theologies including Christian feminists, charge that the experience out of which Christian theology has emerged is not universal experience but the experience of the dominant culture . . . liberationists therefore, propose that theology must emerge out of particular experiences of the oppressed people of God."    - Jacquelyn Grant ; White Women’s Christ and Black Women’s Jesus


"We would not reject the image of God as a Suffering God and would welcome the demise of that distant, impassive patriarch in the clouds who is beyond being affected by the turmoil below. The advent of the Suffering God changes the entire face of theology, but it does not necessarily offer liberation for those who suffer."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"The only legitimate reason for women to remain in the church will be if the church were to condemn as anathema the glorification of suffering. If the church is the place where cycles of abuse are named, condemned, and broken can it be a haven of blessing and a place of peace for women. That the church is such a place is not clearly evident. Whether Christianity in essence frees or imprisons is the issue that must be considered."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"Many women, however, even when conscious of the church's contribution to our suffering, do not leave. We stay in the institution. Feminist theologians who attempt to rework the tradition by finding feminist undercurrents and countercultures, doing new quests for the historical feminist Jesus, and writing women back unto the Bible and the tradition (the Inclusive Language Lectionary is a good example) are trying valiantly to 'fix' the institution so that they can remain in it. They enter the ordained ministry in order to 'redeem' the church, but they pay so high a personal, emotional, and psychological price that they begin to resemble the very people they want to redeem. All the while, they call to their crucified lord to understand their suffering and support them in their times of trial and martyrdom."
   - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"The qualities that Christianity idealizes, especially for women, are also those of a victim: sacrificial love, passive acceptance of suffering, humility, meekness, etc. Since these are the qualities idealized in Jesus 'who died for our sins,' his functioning as a model reinforces the scapegoat syndrome for women"
   - Mary Daly ; Beyond God the Father


"Christianity has been a primary—in many women's lives the primary—force in shaping our acceptance of abuse. The central image of Christ on the cross as the savior of the world communicates the message that suffering is redemptive. If the best person who ever lived gave his life for others, then, to be of value we should likewise sacrifice ourselves. Any sense that we have a right to care for our own needs is in conflict with being a faithful follower of Jesus. Our suffering for others will save the world."    - Joanne Carlson Brown & Rebecca Parker ; God So Loved the World? (Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse)


"Antoinette Wire (2005) believes that women may have carried primary responsibility for stewarding oral Jesus traditions and that the writer of Mark could well have been female. I delight in that possibility."    - Ched Myers ; Binding the Strong Man


"Nonviolence training is important because it empowers us and forces us to consider means and ends, and because it decentralizes power. Most important, however, it strengthens the movement for social change. Feminism remains as important as nonviolence in my thinking. It is my concern to work out any apparent contradictions since I think that one without the other would be unsuccessful."
   - Lynne Shivers ; quoted in Reweaving the Web of Life


"So God created human beings in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them."

   - Moses ; Genesis 1.27


"During his time on earth, Jesus subverted the social norms dictating how a rabbi spoke to women, to the rich, the powerful, the housewife, the mother-in-law, the despised, the prostitute, the adulteress, the mentally ill and demon possessed, the poor. He spoke to women directly, instead of through their male-headship standards and contrary to the order of the day (and even of some religious sects today)."

   - Bessey, Sarah ; Jesus Feminist: An Invitation to Revisit the Bible’s View of Women


"Under the power of the vow, the daughter [of Jephthah] has breathed her last. My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken her?"
   - Phyllis Trible ; Texts of Terror


"Her [Unnamed Concubine from Bethlehem] body has been broken and given to many. Lesser power has no woman than this, that her life is laid down by a man."
   - Phyllis Trible ; Texts of Terror


"This Egyptian slave woman is stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted for the transgressions of Israel. She is bruised for the iniquities of Sarah and Abraham; upon her is the chastisement that makes them whole."
   - Phyllis Trible ; Texts of Terror


"The truth may set you free, but first it will shatter the safe, sweet way you live."    - Sue Monk Kidd ; The Dance of the Dissident Daughter


"When women are restricted from the service of God in any capacity, the Church is mistakenly allowing an imperfect male-dominated ancient culture to drive our understanding and practice of Christ’s redeeming work, instead of Jesus Christ and the whole of the Scriptures."

   - Bessey, Sarah ; Jesus Feminist: An Invitation to Revisit the Bible’s View of Women


"I want to be outside with the misfits, with the rebels, the dreamers, second-chance givers, the radical grace lavishers, the ones with arms wide open, the courageously vulnerable, and among even—or maybe especially— the ones rejected by the Table as not worthy enough or right enough."

   - Bessey, Sarah ; Jesus Feminist: An Invitation to Revisit the Bible’s View of Women


"You saw no form of any kind the day the LORD spoke to you at Horeb out of the fire. Therefore watch yourselves very carefully, so that you do not become corrupt and make for yourselves an idol, an image of any shape, whether formed like a man or a woman . . ."

   - Moses ; Deuteronomy 4.15-16


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